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Asset Management Blog Posts

Arches project has been accepted into Google Summer of Code!

By Farallon Geographics Team on February 26, 2014

Arches project has been accepted into Google Summer of Code!

Farallon Geographics applied to Google Summer of Code for the Arches project (ArchesProject.org). We are excited to announce that we have been approved to be a mentoring organization!

We are looking forward to an exciting summer with awesome contributions from students from the international community.

What is Google Summer of Code?

Google invites students from all over the world, to come up with interesting, non-trivial problems/solutions or enhancements for some of the most important open-source projects and work on them over the summer. Participants get support from the community plus a mentor who and acts as their primary guide to help them stay on track to meet their goals.

Farallon mentors and subject area resources

In addition to a primary mentor, students also receive help from Farallon Geographics subject-area experts including experts in front-end/JavaScript, Python, geospatial database developers, web development and Elasticsearch. CEO Dennis Wuthrich (the architect of Arches) will help students to understand the project and how their efforts can impact the wider Cultural Heritage community. This is an incredible opportunity for students to get involved with the Arches project and get technical mentoring along the way.

How to get involved

First, review the 'Ideas for Improving Arches' project ideas page. The ideas there are meant as starting points. Students are encouraged to review these ideas in much more detail and then give their suggestions and even detailed plans on how they want to proceed. Feel free to add your ideas to list in the Arches community discussion forum.

What skills are needed to work on these ideas?

As long as you're interested in cultural heritage and are not completely new to web programming, you should check out the project. You’ll have a leg up if you know Python for server-side development and JavaScript plus standard CSS3/HTML5 knowledge for front-end development. Familiarity with Django and/or with Model-View-Controller (MVC) patterns is helpful, as is familiarity with JSON, which is used for data transfer between client and server

Farallon knows that students love Open Source software, maps and flip flops. The Arches project and the Google Summer of Code could be your ticket to summer paradise.

About the Arches Project

Arches is a modern, user-friendly, open source information system created to help organizations inventory and manage heritage places of all types. It is a solution that is both applicable and relevant to a broad spectrum of heritage organizations all over the world, while also incorporating complex functions such as semantic ontology, graph database, elastic search and built-in mechanisms to enforce data standards.

Arches project has been accepted into Google Summer of Code!

Tags:   Asset Management,   Cultural Resources,   Database,   Open Source,   Web Mapping

Arches V1.0 released - open-source geospatial system for cultural heritage inventory management

By Farallon Geographics Team on December 04, 2013

The Getty Conservation Institute, World Monuments Fund and Farallon Geographics are excited to announce the release of version 1.0 of Arches, a modern, user-friendly, open source information system created to help organizations inventory and manage heritage places of all types.

For those seeing Arches for the first time, the clean and elegant Arches interface might seem a bit simple on the surface. However, looks can be deceiving. Arches is a solution that is both applicable and relevant to a broad spectrum of heritage organizations all over the world, while also incorporating complex functions such as elastic search and built-in mechanisms to enforce data standards.  For example, the incorporation of the CIDOC Conceptual Reference Model (CRM) enables powerfully effective searches within, as well as between, data sets. It also facilitates data migration to newer systems and aids in the preservation of data over time.

For more information about Arches, read the feature article: “CHANGING THE HERITAGE” (pdf).

The focus now is to build and expand the Arches community to ensure that the system grows and reaches its full potential. You can be a part of Arches’ open source development by sharing your feedback and questions on the Arches community forum, spreading the word throughout the heritage community, making contributions to the Arches code, and/or thinking of other ways to become involved.

Visit The Arches web site to get involved and learn more. 

See Arches 1.0 press release for a general overview.

Tags:   Asset Management,   Cultural Resources,   Web Mapping

Highlights from the Arches Cultural Heritage Workshop in London

By Rob Gaston on August 20, 2013

Highlights from the Arches Cultural Heritage Workshop in London

I recently returned from the Arches workshop in London that we helped the Getty Conservation Institute and World Monuments Fund conduct. The workshop was very well received, so I want to relate some of what we covered and general observations.

What is Arches?

If you are not already familiar, Arches is an open source, geospatial asset management system specifically tailored to the needs of the international cultural heritage field. It can inventory and document all types of immovable heritage, including buildings and other structures, cultural landscapes, heritage ensembles or districts, as well as archaeological sites. The project is a collaboration between the Getty Conservation Institute, World Monuments Fund and Farallon Geographics and updates and enhances our earlier work developing MEGA-Jordan.

About the Arches workshop

The workshop consisted of 3 primary areas of focus:

  1. An introduction to Arches, how it works, and what makes it unique (e.g., open source, semantic framework, interoperability with other systems, OGC standards-based, HTML5 implementation, etc.)
  2. Demos of the application and an opportunity for attendees to get some hands-on time to explore the software and give feedback
  3. Discussions of how interested cultural heritage experts and organizations, will implement and can begin contributing to Arches both as a technical and business solution for their data management needs. There was also a strong focus on ways to contribute to an open source project.

How the workshop was received

The overarching purpose of the workshop was to jump-start a community around the Arches project and invite experts to join that community. Towards this end, the workshop was very successful. Many attendees have already followed up with feedback and questions on how to implement the free open source application code download.

Specific use cases by attendees range from managing an existing inventory of data for use in a research project, collecting heritage data in the field as part of a research project, to storing and managing large warehouses of cultural heritage data for heritage management organizations.

Feedback on the user interface was consistently positive. Users commented about the simple and intuitive nature of the Arches management workflows and how they conceal the relative complexity of the data being managed. We of course got a lot of suggestions for further improvements and refinements!

What's next?

The next workshop will be in September in Strasbourg, France. This will be help attendees to better understand the system in order to potentially set up their own Arches implementation. If you are interested in being attending this event, you can register at cipa2013.org/.

Tags:   Asset Management,   Cultural Resources

eCatch spatial fisheries mapping application gets UI enhancements

By Alexei Peters on July 22, 2013

eCatch spatial fisheries mapping application gets UI enhancements

eCatch is a tool from The Nature Conservancy (TNC) that addresses one of the most difficult aspects of fisheries management: the collection of good fish location data to allow for in-season adaptive management. eCatch addresses this problem using a web-based app for crowd-sourced collection, mapping and sharing of fishing data.

Using eCatch on an iPad, fisherman at sea, report areas where they catch overfished species and learn from other fisherman where the more abundant species are. By collaborating and sharing their fishing logbooks in real-time, fisherman can help:

  • visualize collective spatial patterns in fishing
  • minimize by-catch of depleted species
  • develop by-catch avoidance predictive maps that correlate spatial fisheries data with oceanography variables

Farallon worked with TNC to develop eCatch v1.0 and v2.0 using industry standard and open source technologies for geospatial data access/reporting as well as mapping. Our web team currently works to maintain and further enhance the eCatch 2.0 UI and mapping technology.

Tags:   Asset Management,   Web Mapping

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